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Create a list of the top 10 keywords for which you want to achieve rankings. Do a search once a month on Google and see where you stand in the rankings. Keep a record of the ranking and you will be able to see the progress of your SEO efforts. Note jumps by more than five places in the ranking, because these changes are not usually due just to normal changes and search engine updates. Typing keyphrases into Google is what we do every day, right? We type words into Google’s search box to get answers to our questions. CTR gives some insight into how likely potential visitors are to actually click on your site in the SERPs. Aside from that, maybe a better answer or a different answer would be that things that people tell you you should do don’t always work and vice versa.

The hidden agenda behind link research

SEO and growth hacking share a common root — the mutual desire to grow a site’s traffic — and both disciplines fall under the umbrella of search marketing. If you want to improve Get your arithmetic correct - the primary resources are all available here. Its as easy as KS2 Maths or something like that... your ranking, you have to curate unique content to support the borrowed content. This sounds condescendingly obvious, but Google really dislikes what it calls ‘thin content’. Essentially, these are pages that offer little in way of value to your audience – and will usually come in the form of extremely short webpages comprising only a few sentences. Be honest, and genuine.

Aligning your goals in relation to page rank

What is Thin Content and Why is it Bad for SEO? By Adam Snape on 20th February 2015 Categories: Content, Google, SEO

In February 2011, Google rolled out an update to its search algorithm called Panda – the first in a series of algorithm updates aimed at penalising low quality websites in search and improving the quality of their search results.

Although Panda was first rolled out several years ago (and followed by Penguin, an update aimed at knocking out black-hat SEO techniques) it’s been updated several times since its initial launch, most recently in September of 2014.

The latest Panda update has much the same purpose as the original – giving better rankings to websites that have useful and relevant content, and penalising sites that have “thin” content that offers little or no value to searchers.

In this guide, we’ll look at what makes content “thin” and why having thin content on your site is a bad thing. We’ll also share some simple tactics that you can use to give your content more value to searchers and avoid having to deal with a penalty.

What is thin content? Thin content can be identified as low quality pages that add little to no value to the reader. Examples of thin content include duplicate pages, automatically generated content or doorway pages.

The best way to measure the quality of your content is through user satisfaction. If visitors quickly bounce from your page, it likely doesn’t provide the value they were looking for.

Google’s initial Panda update was targeted primarily at content farms – sites with a massive amount of content written purely for the purpose of ranking well in search and attracting as much traffic as possible.

You’ve probably clicked your way onto a content farm before – most of us have. The content is typically packed with keywords and light on factual information, giving it big relevancy for a search engine but little value for an actual reader.

The original Panda update also targeted scraper websites – sites that “scraped” text from other websites and reposted it as their own, lifting the work of other people to generate their own search traffic.

As Panda updates keep rolling out, the focus has switched from content farms and scraper sites to websites that offer “thin” content – content that’s full of keywords and copy, but light on any real information.

A great way to think of content is as search engine food. The more unique content your website offers search engines, the more satisfied they are and the higher you will likely rank for the keywords your on-page content mentions.

Offer little food and you’ll provide little for Google to use to understand the focus of your site’s content. As a result, you’ll be outranked for your target search keywords by other websites that offer more detailed, helpful and informative content.

How can Google tell if content is thin? Google’s index includes more than 30 trillion pages, making it impossible to check every page for thin content by hand. While some websites are occasionally subject to a manual review by Google, most content is judged for its value algorithmically.

The ultimate judge of a website’s content is its audience – the readers that visit the site and actually read its content. If the content is good, they’ll probably stay on the website and keep reading; if it’s bad, there’s a good chance they’ll leave.

The length of your content isn’t necessarily an indicator of its “thinness”. As Stephen Kenwright explains at Search Engine Watch, a 2,000 word article on EzineArticles is likely to offer less value to readers than a 500 word blog post by a real expert.

One way Google can algorithmically judge the value of a website’s content is using a metric called “time to long click”. A long click is when a user clicks on a search result and stays on the website for a long time before returning to Google’s search page.

Think about how you browse a website when you discover great quality content. If a blog post or article is particularly engaging, you don’t just read for a minute or two – you click around the website and view other content as well.

A short click, on the other hand, is when a user clicks on a search result and almost immediately returns to Google’s search results page. From here, they might click on another result, indicating to Google that the first result didn’t provide much value.

Should you be worried about thin content? The best measure of your content’s value is user satisfaction. If users stay on your website for a long time after clicking onto it from Google’s search results pages, it probably has high quality, “thick” content that Google likes. ore than just improve your search rankings, a well-intentioned approach to SEO will lead to a better overall user experience. And providing a memorable experience for your audience should be the #1 priority on your list. earch engines don’t read images, they read the ALT text instead. You should use an ALT attribute to help engine crawlers better understand the meaning of an image and what it represents. Keep an eye on organic search and watch out for drops in search performance, attribute those drops to specific actions, and develop a game plan for recovery and beyond.

Your marketing strategy could use a facelift - consider including bounce rates to adhere to best practise SEO principles

A small dip in search traffic is no immediate cause for concern (it may just be a temporary drop in consumer interest); but if that dip lasts for more than a few weeks or turns into a more significant drop, you’ll need to troubleshoot the problem to see what’s going on. The biggest difference between the two approaches is the level of formality and experimentation. While there plenty of differences between SEO and content marketing, there are also many areas where they overlap. Taking advantage of this overlap and using it in your website is the quickest way to get more people to visit your site. According to Gaz Hall, a UK SEO Consultant from SEO York: "One of the biggest mistakes to make when it comes to Twitter marketing is to focus, completely, on your brand identity."

Top trends in javascript to watch

We really only need time, experience, and research to help identify thin and duplicate content and make them better. Removing I'm always shocked by osoo, in this regard. bad backlinks can help improve your site's ranking on Google. Not only do low-quality links reduce your website’s credibility, but they may also result in Google penalties (link is external) that will drop your site down the rankings. The most effective way to boost your website’s indexation is through linking. The paths that the spiders take through the Internet are formed by links. When one page links to another page, the spider follows that path. Within your own website, make sure that you’ve created links to and from all your most important pages. According to released research, Google is providing a direct answer within its browser to around 20% of total search engine queries.